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Agricultural Marketing Resource Center

Peaches


peaches
    Photo courtesy of USDA ARS.

Overview

The two basic types of peaches are clingstone and freestone. With clingstone peaches, the flesh “clings” to the "stone" of the peach, making it difficult to separate, and thus more suitable for processing. In addition, this variety retains its flavor and soft texture during processing.

The pit of freestone peaches "freely" separates from the flesh, making it ideal for fresh consumption. Freestone peaches are generally larger than clingstones with a firmer, less juicy texture. While most commonly eaten fresh, these peaches may also be frozen and dried.  September 2013 . . .  Peaches


Marketing

Production

Businesses/Case Studies

  • Chappell Farms, Kline, South Carolina - Grow and market wholesale and retail peaches under the "Pat's Pride" name. Peaches are shipped throughout the United States and Canada. The farm also sells gift boxes directly to customers online.
  • Durbin Farms, Jemison, Alabama -  This farm has 150 acres in production and peaches are the staple crop. The farm also raises plums, nectarines, apples, blueberries and strawberries. It sells fruit at a market located next to an interstate exit as well as online.
  • Paradise Orchards, Felton, Delaware - Raises more than 20 different varieties of peaches and nectarines on 10 acres. The orchard sells peach gift boxes online.
  • Susquehanna Orchards, Delta, Pennsylvania - Sells several varieties of peaches and apples from the 100-year-old slate roofed barn. Occasionally the farm has portions of the orchard open for pick-your-own.
  • Texas Hill Country Peaches, Fredericksburg, Texas - This group of peach growers has a website listing each orchard's specialty, directions, hours of operation and phone numbers.


Links checked March 2012.

 

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